How to avoid getting beat or shot by the police as taught by the Buffalo Soldiers

Indiana Avenue hosts survival summit

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Playing the role of police are, front, Kayena Hynes, and Jalon Green. Passengers in the car are, clockwise, driver, Teonte Kiser, passenger, Cameron Knabbs, behind him is Ward Barnett, and Kristen Clark.

BY JURRY TAALIB-DEEN
Journal Staff Writer

“Show your hands; if it’s night time, make sure the dome light of the car is on; make sure your music is off, and the passengers are quiet; and definitely make sure you generate conversation between yourself, and the police officer if you need to get your identification out of your pocket, or from the glove compartment,” said Earl Mack, former police officer, and President of the Toledo Buffalo Soldiers, to an audience of youth and young adults.

The event was a type of youth summit that showed youth and young adults how to respond if pulled over by the police. It was held at Indiana Avenue Missionary Baptist Church, 640 Indiana Ave., last month, followed by other youth activities in September and October.

Robin Hagans, church secretary, said that, they wanted kids, and young people to know the proper way to respond to the police if stopped.

“So many people are being killed by the police, young and old; it’s really bad out here,” she told The Toledo Journal.

Earl Mack, president of the Buffalo Soldiers, repeatedly emphasized that, if stopped by the police, comply, and complain later, even if the officer is rude. “You can’t win on the streets,” he said.
Earl Mack, president of the Buffalo Soldiers, repeatedly emphasized that, if stopped by the police, comply, and complain later, even if the officer is rude. “You can’t win on the streets,” he said.

Mr. Mack said the Buffalo Soldiers are comprised of former law enforcement officers, military personnel, and government workers. “We just want to make sure that the young people get home safely, if stopped by police,” he said. “Even if the officer is rude, still comply, so you can get home safely, and then complain,” Mr. Mack said.

As part of, getting home safely, the Buffalo Soldiers had role playing as a part of their educational lesson.

Four participants would sit in a model car that the Buffalo Soldiers use as a prop when teaching. Then, two other students would approach the car, playing the role of the police officers. One of the scenarios shows unruly passengers in the car, when approached by police, and how the police may respond to the scenario. Afterwards, the participants, as well as those in the audience, discussed what went wrong, and how the passengers should’ve responded.

“I learned how we’re supposed to respond when confronted by police,” said Teontre Kiser, 12. “I know I’m supposed to ask when getting my driver’s license, and never be rude or I might get beat, or shot,” he said.

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