Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union Hosts 21st Appreciation Banquet

Thirteen honored for their contributions

0
97
Member of the Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union’s board, who helped make the night possible are, from left, Edwin Shy, Suzette Cowell, Debra Miler, Fletcher Word, Adele Jason, Fran Smith, and Pastor Tim Pettaway.

BY JURRY TAALIB-DEEN
Journal Staff Writer

Some of the people honored at the Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union’s Twenty-first Annual Appreciation Banquet, may not be the typical household names, when mentioned, as those who work in the community, and who have helped the credit union become successful, but the staff knows their works, and wanted Toledo to know how they’ve affected the city in a positive way.

Thus, on Saturday, November 18, 2017, 13 members from the community were, “Given their flowers, while they’re still living,” as explained to The Toledo Journal by Suzette Cowell, CEO, of the Toledo Urban Federal Credit Union, at parkway Plaza, 2592 Parkway Plaza, Maumee, Ohio.

With the theme, “Building Better Futures,” the gala featured local media personality, Alexis Means, as the Mistress of Ceremony, a musical performance by Barbara Howard, the comedic artistry of Darrell Banks, a scholarship presentation, and musical performance by national, and international recording superstars, The Manhattans featuring Gerald Alston.

“With all the negative things going on in the world, I think it’s important to highlight what the good people are doing, and to reward them for their works,” said Ms. Cowell.

Suzette Cowell, CEO, left, sits with the 2017 honorees. From left is, Paul Toth Jr., Albert Prince Bell, Ruby Butler, Eve Allen Crittenden, and former Toledo City Mayor, Carlton Finkbeiner.
Suzette Cowell, CEO, left, sits with the 2017 honorees. From left is, Paul Toth Jr., Albert Prince Bell, Ruby Butler, Eve Allen Crittenden, and former Toledo City Mayor, Carlton Finkbeiner.

Amongst those 13 being honored was local gospel artist, Darrius Coleman. “This is very humbling,” he said. “Being honored is a type of rejuvenation that makes me want to keep doing things for the community,” Mr. Coleman said.

The youngest of the honorees was 16 year old, Zia Cooke. The Rogers High School basketball star has gained national attention for her play in youth Olympics, and has been considered, by most college basketball experts, to potentially be one of the greatest players ever. But the humbled teen simply said, “It’s truly amazing, and a huge blessing to be amongst those honored tonight. Tonight is truly an honor for me.”

LEAVE A REPLY